B-372, an adult female bobcat, died from rat poison. AB 1788 would restrict the use of such poisons in California.

A rescue group has filed a lawsuit against the City of Los Angeles for using the pandemic as an excuse to illegally turn away stray and injured animals. California is on the verge of closing loopholes that allowed breeders to violate its ban on the retail sale of commercially-bred dogs, cats and rabbits in pet stores by masquerading as rescue groups. The Dutch government has announced that effective in March, mink farms will become illegal, years earlier than planned. The number of communities in the 90% Club — an important milestone on the road to No Kill — is increasing. And legislation to severely restrict the use of extremely toxic anticoagulant rodenticides that have killed bobcats and mountain lions has passed both the California Assembly and Senate. It is awaiting the Governor’s signature.

In case you missed it:

The number of communities in the 90% Club — an important milestone on the road to No Kill — is increasing, including:

And finally, the body of B-372, a bobcat who died of rat poisoning, was found “under an oak tree in an Agoura Hills neighborhood…” She is not the only one. In April of last year, National Park Service biologists in the Santa Monica (CA) Mountains tracked a mountain lion’s GPS collar after it sent out “a mortality signal.” They found the mountain lion, dubbed P-47, dead of rat poisoning. In fact, there have been three deaths of mountain lions in the last two years. And “Biologists have documented the presence of anticoagulant rodenticide compounds in 21 out of 22 local mountain lions that have been tested, including in a three-month-old kitten.” But there is hope. AB 1788 would severely curtail extremely toxic anticoagulant rodenticides like the ones poisoning bobcats and mountain lions. It has passed both the California Assembly and Senate and is awaiting the Governor’s signature.

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