The 15th horse this year has been killed at Santa Anita. A new study finds that stereotypes about men with cats continues among some demographics. The Atlantic City and North Little Rock shelters are seeing record placements and two new communities, one in Texas and the other in Alabama, report 90%+ statistics. And finally, while many shelters have risen to the challenge posed by the pandemic, others have turned their backs on animals by closing their doors.

In case you missed it:

Additional communities are reporting annual statistics, increasing the number of cities and counties in the 90% Club, an important milestone on the road to No Kill, including:

And finally, while many shelters have risen to the challenge posed by the pandemic, embracing ingenuity, a “can do” attitude, and technology to save the animals, and, as a result, “placed record numbers of dogs, cats and other animals,” others turned their backs on animals by closing their doors. Austin, TX, once the pillar of the No Kill movement, chose the latter. And an April e-mail written by Don Bland, the head of the Austin shelter, proposed making some of the changes permanent. Specifically, Bland called for “not accepting strays at the shelter” even after the pandemic is over as a way to limit intakes. According to a local news report, “Those plans include turning away strays, and only taking in sick and injured animals and those with serious behavioral problems.” Thankfully, that plan was D.O.A., but it continues to portend a worrisome trend in sheltering among those seeking to do less for animals, rather than more.

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