Horse racing is killing horses. No Kill 101, the latest video from the No Kill Advocacy Center, shows why and especially how any community can achieve No Kill. New Kent County, VA, reported a placement rate of 99% for dogs, 98% for cats, and 100% for rabbits and other animals. Northumberland County, VA, reported a placement rate of 96% for dogs and 99% for cats. King George County, VA, reported a placement rate of 93% for dogs and 93% for cats. And finally, saving lives in the age of coronavirus: a look at what creative shelters across the country are doing to place the animals in their care.

In case you missed it:

Horse racing is killing horses, with roughly 10 deaths per week on U.S. tracks. Moreover, racing isn’t the only way they die. Thousands of thoroughbreds also go from the racetrack to the slaughterhouse and end up on dinner plates in Europe and Asia.

– Today, millions of Americans live in cities and towns that have dramatically reduced and even eliminated the killing of healthy and treatable animals in their shelters, placing upwards of 99% and more. Created for government officials, shelter managers, and rescuers, the No Kill Advocacy Center’s new No Kill 101 video shows why and especially how any community can achieve No Kill.

– Proving the point, New Kent County, VA, reported a placement rate of 99% for dogs, 98% for cats, and 100% for rabbits and other animals. For dogs and rabbits, New Kent County is part of the most exclusive club in the movement — those placing at least 99% of the animals.

– Similarly, Northumberland County, VA, reported a placement rate of 96% for dogs and 99% for cats. For cats, it is part of the most exclusive club in the movement.

– King George County, VA, is also part of the 90% Club, an important milestone on the road to No Kill. It reported a placement rate of 93% for dogs and 93% for cats.

And finally, while the coronavirus pandemic has exposed deep insufficiencies in our country’s social and public health safety net for people, it has also exposed, in some quarters, our total abdication of our duty to dogs, cats, rabbits and other animals. By closing their doors to the public and suspending adoptions, “shelters” are failing to live up to their responsibilities. Here’s what they should be doing instead.

Thankfully many are, and proving that the recipe for saving lives remains the same as before the coronavirus pandemic and can achieve similar results.

————-

Have a comment? Join the discussion by clicking here.