Every animal up for adoption at some shelters in Wisconsin, Texas, Nevada, Ohio, Iowa, and Minnesota finds a home amid coronavirus pandemic. Shelters in Virginia, New Jersey, Georgia, and Florida get creative to save lives during the current crisis. And entire regions are running out of dogs and cats due to increased demand in response to pleas for assistance. Unfortunately, whether a community realizes this kind of success depends on local “shelter” managers and the officials that oversee them, with some putting animals at grave and mortal risk by closing to the public. And finally, a new study shows that Americans are not very knowledgeable when it comes to which large, national groups are effective at helping animals, believing that being well known means they are also effective. There is one exception: PETA.

In case you missed it:

Across the country, progressive shelters are embracing ingenuity, a “can do” attitude, and technology to save the animals, while also protecting the public and shelter workers. For example:

These efforts have been so successful that entire regions are running out of dogs and cats to place in homes. Unfortunately, whether a community realizes this kind of success depends on local “shelter” managers and the officials that oversee them, following a typical pattern, with regions that embraced innovation before the current crisis merely extending it to novel circumstances and those that had not simply closing to the public, putting animals at grave and mortal risk.

And finally, a new study shows that the public is not very knowledgeable when it comes to which large, national groups are effective at helping animals. For the most part, they equate being well known with being effective. There is one exception: PETA. PETA “had the lowest average perceived impact on animal well-being and health care.”

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