“There is no progressive sheltering agency of any scope or stature willing to philosophically embrace gas systems for the killing of any species of animals.” Yet in spite of more modern, less stressful and less painful methods of killing, the Green River City Council in Wyoming voted to continue killing animals by gas.

Despite alarmist headlines about post-pandemic adoption returns, intakes are down overall. The Green River, WY, City Council voted to continue killing animals by gas. The Florida legislature has passed a bill requiring crossreporting of animal and child abuse. Current California budget proposals call for spending $230,000,000 to make our roads safer for animals. A New Jersey pound has rejected a request by caretakers to foster visibly pregnant cats in order to allow the kittens to be born, weaned, adopted, and then have the mother spayed. Steffen Baldwin, a well-known and until relatively recently beloved “animal activist,” was indicted last year in Ohio on “charges of cruelty to companion animals, grand theft, bribery, telecommunications fraud, tampering with evidence and impersonating a peace officer. The charges are related to the deaths of at least 18 dogs.” Baldwin is back in court facing elevated charges. And a new study looked at how staff members of kill pounds navigate the “tensions” of working at a place that is supposed to “care” for animals but instead kills them.

In case you missed it:

And finally, a new study looked at how staff members of kill pounds navigate the “tensions” of working at a place that is supposed to “care” for animals but instead kills them. This contradiction is what the authors call “the caring-killing paradox.” I call it evil. To read more about this study and my analysis of it, please join me on my new Substack page. While there, you can sign up to receive emails when a new article is posted.

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