Petco announced that they will no longer sell shock collars because the collars cause “stress,” “fear,” and “pain.” Racine, WI, paid out $270,000 after its police officers illegal shot and killed dogs who posed no threat and then perjured themselves. The French government announced changes to end the exploitation of animals for entertainment and fur farming. A new biography tells the story of Henry Bergh, the founder of the first SPCA and the animal rights movement in America. The number of communities in the 90% Club — an important milestone on the road to No Kill — is increasing. And the University of Denver has determined that enforcement of the city’s “pit bull” ban has cost taxpayers over $100,000,000 over the last 30 years, but has not resulted in a measurable impact on public safety.

In case you missed it:

– Petco announced this week that they will no longer be selling shock collars. In a press release, the company said shock collars cause “stress,” “fear,” and “pain” and have “no business” being sold by a company “dedicated to improving” the lives of companion animals. It’s long past due.

– The police department in Racine, WI, settled lawsuits for $270,000 in which its police officers killed three dogs who posed no threat and then perjured themselves. It’s not the first time.

– France announced an immediate ban on the acquisition and breeding of dolphins and orcas by marine parks, a phased-in closure of those parks, a ban on the use of wild animals in circuses and other traveling shows, and a ban on mink farming. “It is time to open a new era in our relationship with these animals.”

– A new biography tells the story of Henry Bergh, the founder of the first SPCA and the animal rights movement in America.

The number of communities in the 90% Club — an important milestone on the road to No Kill — is increasing, including:

– Kalkaska County, MI, reported a 99% placement rate for dogs and 98% for cats. For dogs, it is part of the most exclusive club in the movement — those placing 99%+.

– Likewise, Roscommon, MI, reported a 99% placement rate for dogs and 95% for cats.

– The shelter that serves both Iron County, WI, and Gogebic County, MI, reported a 99% placement rate for dogs and 96% for cats.

– Midland County, MI, meanwhile, reported a 98% placement rate for dogs and 96% for cats.

– Washtenaw County, MI, reported a 92% placement rate for dogs, 94% for cats, and 95% for rabbits and other small animals.

And, finally, the University of Denver has announced that they have completed research on the economic impact of Denver’s “pit bull” ban. The study found that enforcement of the ban has cost taxpayers over $100,000,000 over the last 30 years, but has not resulted in a measurable impact on public safety. The research also determined that enforcement is unequal and predominantly race-based. And it results in Denver being a “bad neighbor.” In other words, say the authors, “it adds pressure to the state’s sheltering system” because surrounding communities and rescue groups have to take on the burden for Denver’s regressive and selfish policies in order to save the lives of these dogs. Denver voters have a chance to undo the ban in the November election by approving Measure 2J.

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